Fort Lauderdale
Fort Lauderdale

Fort Lauderdale

Florida, United States
There's more to life and Ft. Lauderdale than spring break: beyond the action-packed east beaches, you can watch dolphins pass on quiet north end beaches, enjoy non-souvenir shopping along Dania Beach, take a historic River Walk past landmarks, or unwind over sea-breezy dining in elegant Las Olas Isles.
Getting Around Fort Lauderdale
The best way to get around Fort Lauderdale is the inexpensive (free to $0.50) Sun Trolley. There are no pre-determined stops along the Sun Trolley Route. Instead, flag the driver to indicate you would like a pickup and notify for a drop off. The Sun Trolley picks up at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport Friday, Saturday and Sunday every hour on the hour from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fort Lauderdale is also very car friendly. Numerous garages are available and generally cost less than $10. Public bikes are available throughout Fort Lauderdale (http://broward.bcycle.com/) with a $5 single ride (up to 30 minute) pass and a 7-day membership starting at $25.
Nearby Airports
  • Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport-FLL
  • Miami International Airport-MIA
  • Palm Beach International Airport-PBI
Airport Taxis
  • $12-Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
  • $81-Miami International Airport $132.25-Palm Beach International Airport
Things to Do and See in Fort Lauderdale
Las Olas IslesBeverly HeightsDowntownLauderdale BeachLauderdale WestLauderdale by the SeaLauderdale HarboursDania Beach
Along this stretch of pavement are prime venues for eating, shopping, and stunning views. An architecturally elegant area with starry lights and a cool breeze, this is an upscale district with few of the typical T-shirt and souvenir kiosks. Sticking to well-lit, populated areas at night is easy in this well-illuminated, trendy district. If you're here to party, note that the club scene doesn't get started until after 9 pm.
To travel back in time, take the River Walk on the outskirts of Downtown Fort Lauderdale in the Beverly Heights district. Many of the historic buildings have been revitalized and repurposed, but some original features remain. Walking along the New River, you will see a turn of the 20th Century schoolhouse, a historic settler's home, and the vintage 1905 New River Inn. Tour the old schoolhouse and the Stranahan House, dating from from the late 1800s and filled with antiques, artifacts and photographs. Visit the Museum of Discovery and Science, and take advantage of museum garage, the safest and most efficient parking in the area.
Las Olas Boulevard is the most interesting downtown area for tourists. To explore downtown and the beaches, hop the Fort Lauderdale Sun Trolley on Fridays, Saturdays, or Sundays between 10 am and midnight. Just wave at a passing trolley, which will stop to let you board. If you're traveling with kids, stop by the Funderdome indoor playground or the Museum of Discovery and Science—admission to the science center is free if you hold an annual pass to any of 300 science centers across the country. Admission is also free to the 18,000 square-foot Fort Lauderdale Antique Car Museum, a paradise within paradise for car buffs.
The main action in Fort Lauderdale is around the east beaches and the south-central downtown area. Many of the beaches on the far north end of Ft. Lauderdale have homes with private beach access, but there are still many public beaches and parks that are quieter than the spring break chaos of the New River area. Also in the northern corner is the Mai-Kai Restaurant and Polynesian Show, featuring fire eaters, Polynesian dancing and acrobatics with dinner.
The main action in Fort Lauderdale is around the east beaches and the south-central downtown area. Many of the beaches on the far north end of Ft. Lauderdale have homes with private beach access, but there are still many public beaches and parks that are quieter than the spring break chaos of the New River area. Also in the northern corner is the Mai-Kai Restaurant and Polynesian Show, featuring fire eaters, Polynesian dancing and acrobatics with dinner.
The village of Lauderdale by the Sea is a low-key beach town northeast of Fort Lauderdale, ideal for families staying away from the city's spring break scene. For locals-approved dining, try Country Ham & Eggs for breakfast or Pa' DeGennaro's Restaurant & Deli for lunch or dinner. Head to the coast just before sunset, and you have a great chance of spotting dolphins frolicking in the waves.
The main action in Fort Lauderdale is around the east beaches and the south-central downtown area. Many of the beaches on the far north end of Ft. Lauderdale have homes with private beach access, but there are still many public beaches and parks that are quieter than the spring break chaos of the New River area. Also in the northern corner is the Mai-Kai Restaurant and Polynesian Show, featuring fire eaters, Polynesian dancing and acrobatics with dinner.
Nestled along the coast between Fort Lauderdale and Miami is serene Dania Beach. This is where Fort Lauderdale locals come when they want to enjoy pristine sand and warm Atlantic waters without being crowded by tourists. Leave your car and walk through this quaint village, exploring gift shops, jewelry stores, gourmet chocolates and ice cream parlors. The scene is family friendly, though at night Dania's a poker betting bar draws a more adult crowd.
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