Minneapolis
Minneapolis

Minneapolis

Minnesota, United States
The Twin Cities combine Midwestern charm and cutting-edge cool. These twin traits can be found on both sides of town: St. Paul's Science Museum and Minneapolis' Walker Art Center; Minneapolis' Target Field and St. Paul's edgy Artists' Quarter; Linden Hills' "Small of America" mom-and-pop diners and Minneapolis' hip Warehouse District bistros.
Getting Around Minneapolis
The best way to get around Minneapolis is by walking. Walking is a unique experience in the city's skyways (enclosed walkways that connect 50 square blocks). Taxis are readily available and affordable. Visit http://www.taxifarefinder.com/main.php?city=Minneapolis for more information on taxis. Public transit (busses and trains) is an economical way to get around the city. The only difference between buses and trains is the service area. Peak fare is $2.25 and off-peak is $1.75. Peak times are 6 to 9 a.m. and 2 to 6:30 p.m. Day passes are available for $6 and are valid for buses and trains. Schedules and routes can be found at http://www.metrotransit.org/ . Bicycle sharing is available through Nice Ride Minnesota (https://www.niceridemn.org/): 24 hour passes start at $6 and the first 30 minutes are free.
Nearby Airports
  • Minneapolis–Saint Paul International Airport-MSP
Airport Taxis
  • $35 Minneapolis
  • $45 St. Paul
Things to Do and See in Minneapolis
Liden HillsNorth Loop/Warehouse DistrictUptownSewardLind-BohanonBryn MawrSouthwest MinneapolisLowry HillDowntown WestLongfellowTangletown
Sometimes called "a small town in the city" or "The Small of America" (a knock on the massive Mall of America), Linden Hills is an upscale village that has lakes, fine dining, and family fun. Pause for reflection at the Peace Gardens and Rose Gardens, hop back in time on an antique trolley, savor your pick of restaurants, or enjoy a yoga retreat. Lake Harriet has a historic bandshell that hosts concerts every night from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Browse old-timey local establishments—there's a toymaker, bakery, butcher, and hardware store—and you'll appreciate the neighborhood's motto: "Shop. Savor. Stroll."
North Loop/Warehouse Districtmore on North Loop/Warehouse District »
Hugging the mighty Mississippi River, the hip Warehouse District is home to singles and retirees who've traded in homes in the suburbs for condos on the river. The northern edge of downtown Minneapolis, the Warehouse District is home to world-renowned Guthrie Theater (don't miss the theater's Endless Bridge, cantilevered over the river) and the Mill City Museum, recalling the city's flour-mill past. Besides some of the hottest restaurants in town, you'll find coffee, yoga, theater, and nightlife in this bustling district.
You can't miss the marquee for the Uptown Theater, a newly renovated, nearly 100-year-old icon at the heart of Uptown. Uptown stays up late with rooftop restaurants and night clubs, but gets up early to host lakeside races and events. Calhoun Square and Hennepin Avenue host boutiques, outdoorsy shops, hot restaurants, and tattoo parlors. The biggest local draws are Uptown Art Fair and Lake Calhoun, now offering outdoor seafood dining at Tin Fish restaurant.
Adjacent to the Midtown Greenway bike path, Seward is a southeast Minneapolis neighborhood known for its co-ops, cafes, culture, and community. The neighborhood's Franklin Avenue corridor is dotted with ethnic restaurants, small businesses, nonprofits, and community activists. One of the oldest neighborhoods in Minneapolis, Seward came to life with the Milwaukee Railroad in the 19th century, and has made its mark on city with continued growth and a vibrant immigrant population.
Sometimes called "a small town in the city" or "The Small of America" (a knock on the massive Mall of America), Linden Hills is an upscale village that boasts lakes, fine dining and family fun. Pause for reflection at the Peace Gardens and Rose Gardens, hop back in time on an antique trolley, savor your pick of restaurants or enjoy a yoga retreat. Lake Harriet has a historic bandshell that hosts concerts every night from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Browse old-timey local establishments—there's a toymaker, bakery, butcher and hardware store—and you'll appreciate the neighborhood's motto: "Shop. Savor. Stroll."
Despite its small size and awkward shape, this sweet neighborhood just west of downtown is encircled by 650 acres of parks offering outdoor action year-round. Bryn Mawr's Theodore Wirth Park includes the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden, the oldest public wildflower garden in the United States with more than 500 plant species and 130 types of birds. Local restaurants, cafes, and small shops round out the neighborhood's quiet charm.
Bordered by the ritzy suburb of Edina, Southwest Minneapolis is home to families, lakes, creeks, parks, and sweet local restaurants. Whether you're walking your dog, lazing days away at an outdoor cafe or browsing charming neighborhood shops, you will feel at home in this easygoing neighborhood.
Sometimes called "a small town in the city" or "The Small of America" (a knock on the massive Mall of America), Linden Hills is an upscale village that boasts lakes, fine dining and family fun. Pause for reflection at the Peace Gardens and Rose Gardens, hop back in time on an antique trolley, savor your pick of restaurants or enjoy a yoga retreat. Lake Harriet has a historic bandshell that hosts concerts every night from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Browse old-timey local establishments—there's a toymaker, bakery, butcher and hardware store—and you'll appreciate the neighborhood's motto: "Shop. Savor. Stroll."
Whether the home team is winning or losing, Downton's new Twins Stadium (aka Target Field) hosts throngs of fans throughout baseball season. With 150 days of events, parades and celebrations per year, downtown Minneapolis mixes business with pleasure. Downtown packs local flavor, with locally owned shops and restaurants edging out the big chains. Other Downtown attractions include the architecturally striking Central Library, the famous lookout at Foshay Tower, Loring Park and colorful theaters on Hennepin Avenue.
Named after writer Henry Wadsforth Longfellow, the Longfellow neighborhood runs along the west bank of the Mississippi River in south Minneapolis. Short on nightlife, Longfellow is brimming with mom-and-pop restaurants—you won't find many chains in this independent-minded neighborhood. The League of Longfellow Artists sponsors "the biggest little neighborhood art crawl in Minnesota," the LoLa Art Crawl. Longfellow residents weren't surprised when the city of Minneapolis was recognized as the number one Bike City in the United States, since they regularly bike the Midtown Greenway to the river or Downtown.
With tangled streets running haphazardly between south and southwest Minneapolis, this area was dubbed Tangletown in 1996 to better reflect its character. The neighborhood is confusing by car but enjoyable on foot—so walk, don't drive, to urban Tangletown Gardens and scenic Minnehaha Creek. It's also home to cafés, gyms, salons and Wild Acres Eatery, featuring locally raised and produced food (save room for the frozen custard). Tangletown's Nicollet Avenue still has four Lustron houses, which are porcelain-enameled steel on the outside and metal on the inside. These low-maintenance homes were marketed to GIs after World War II, and less than 1,500 remain today.
Our friends at Eater.com pick the city's best restaurants each quarter, and we trust their opinion. See full list »
112 Eatery
The foie gras meatballs grab all the attention, but every dish on Isaac Becker's menu is a standout, from the veal tongue to the cauliflower fritters (who knew?). Stick to the smaller plates for a wider variety of inventive bites.
The Bachelor Farmer
Bringing Minnesota dining back to its Nordic roots, Chef Paul Berglund offers a menu focusing on simple, seasonal fare. Make sure to order at least one (or two, or three) items from the "toasts" section of the menu.
Union Restaurant & Rooftop
With its mid-November opening, downtown restaurant Union brings rooftop dining to Minneapolis year-round. But the retractable glass roof isn't the only draw at Union. Jim Christiansen's menu holds its own, with must-have menu items like the already famed shallot-bacon donut holes. Wash them down with one of Minneapolis master bartender Johnny Michael's cocktails, also available at the building's basement-level nightspot, Marquee.
Butcher & the Boar
Widely considered the top new restaurant of 2012, Butcher & the Boar's got everything Minneapolis loves: a wide variety of housemade sausages and cured meats, a great selection of local beers, and, best of all, a year-round patio (heated and enclosed during the winter).
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