New York City
New York City

New York City

New York, United States
Scoring last-minute tickets to Broadway shows, hitting a gallery opening in Chelsea, nabbing a runway seat at New York Fashion Week, getting a dinner reservation in SoHo or hailing a cab Midtown: contact sports can't compare to the adrenaline rush of just being alive in New York.
Getting Around New York City
The best way to get around New York is by walking and using the subway. The subway and bus system generally runs 24 hours, with some exceptions. Taxis are readily available, but traffic can make it a costly and slow option.
Nearby Airports
  • John F. Kennedy International Airport-JFK
  • LaGuardia Airport-LGA
  • Newark International Airport-EWR
Airport Taxis
  • $52 from JFK
  • $26 from LGA
  • $35 from EWR
  • (All rates are exclusive of bridge and tunnel tolls, which can range from $4-$6.)
Things to Do and See in New York City
ChelseaWall StreetUpper East SideWilliamsburgMorningside HeightsMidtown EastPark SlopeSouth BronxDowntown BrooklynUpper West SideMidtown WestTribecaChinatownLower East SideNolitaWashington HeightsSoHoGreenwich VillageLittle ItalyNoHoGreenpointEast VillageDUMBOBrooklyn HeightsHarlem
Grassy knolls and galleries define Chelsea -- but don't expect to spot them from the street. The High Line is a grass strip hovering 30 feet over 10th Ave, with wildflowers sprouting where railroad tracks used to be. Entrances every two blocks offer access to the High Line's bucolic paths and picnics in an outdoor ampitheatre. West of 10th Avenue, 200-plus galleries are nestled among the auto repair shops between 14th and 25th Streets. Occasionally, garage doorways have been cut away to reveal Yayoi Kusama's giant polka-dotted mushrooms and other modernist marvels. Breakthrough artistic talents await discovery inside industrial warehouses, especially at Friday evening receptions and openings the first Thursday of each month. To warm up for gallery walks and Eight Ave boutique trawls, hit the gyms, pool, batting cage, rock climbing wall and ice rink at Chelsea Piers.
The business end of Manhattan can get unexpectedly emotional. Besides the unnaturally altered skyline marked by the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, there are stirring riverside views of the Statue of Liberty. Romantics can sail into the sunset from Battery Park, where ferries depart to Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, and Staten Island. The bronze Wall Street bull at Bowling Green Park has survived mockery and guerrilla art, including yarn-bombing that left the fierce beast wearing a pink crocheted cozy. Economic outrage brought Occupy Wall Street to the Financial District's Zuccotti Park, but raw deals aren't new around here. In 1626, Dutch traders bought Manhattan from Native American Lenape people for about $1,000 in trade goods. Some restitution has been made for unfair trading: The old US Customs House now serves as the National Museum of American Indian. Business is forgotten inside trendy bars at South Street Seaport, as long as you're buying.
The stores here might seem expensive, but the Upper East Side is priceless. Master thieves must dream about the jewels and artworks strewn along Fifth Avenue's Museum Mile, from the Frick Collection's salons to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum's snail-shaped gallery. The Metropolitan Museum of Art's 2 million artifacts showcase civilization's finer moments, from the ancient Egyptian Temple of Dendur facing Central Park to Alexander McQueen's alien gowns at the Met Costume Institute. For aspiring artists, the most valuable real estate in America is a spot on the wall at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Careers are made overnight for the 50-odd artists selected for the Whitney Biennial, held in even-numbered years. The Jewish Museum puts 26,000 prized objects into cultural perspective, including works by Man Ray and Marc Chagall. The latest addition to Museum Mile is Neue Gallerie, featuring Expressionist artists from Germany and Austria. Stock up on masterpieces at Sotheby's, followed by drinks stiff enough to cure sticker shock at Auction House. To shake off those museum legs, take a carriage ride through Central Park or hit the courts at Asphalt Green, a 1941 factory creatively repurposed as a sports facility. The Upper East Side's best bargain is the 92nd Street Y, with its vast swimming pool, 2,000-plus community arts classes, and lectures in the auditorium.
Williamsburg and Greenpoint can get a tad smug, but there's no denying their historic charms. City Reliquary collects quality Statue of Liberty kitsch and only-in-New-York stories, like the one about the guy who tried every pizza slice in the city. Williamsburg enjoys the simple pleasures in life: German Chocolate cake in the backyard at Bakeri, spelling bees for free hooch at Pete's Candy Store, 1980s video games and craft beer at Barcade. Reinvented American classics like chicken cooked under a brick are served with a knowing wink and sides of oysters at Williamsburg's Marlow & Sons. For simple, honest meat and drink, try Peter Luger, a 100-year-old German steakhouse, or head to Fette Sau for barbecue and bourbon in a converted auto body shop. Williamsburg hotels have more space and none of the traffic hassles of Manhattan, plus it's that much closer to La Guardia and JFK airports.
Right above the Upper West Side is Morningside Heights, a classic overachiever with Manhattan's highest concentration of colleges and seminaries. The Hungarian Pastry Shop and Oren's Daily Roast provide fuel for recitals at Manhattan School of Music, picnics and protests at Columbia University's Low Library, and browsing Barnard College's collection of 'zines by women. For contemplative moments away from the roar of downtown, roam the grounds at Grant's Tomb and check out an organ concert at the unfinished Cathedral of St. John the Divine. North of 125th St., Washington Heights revives the senses with Dominican diners and unexpected artistic masterpieces. The Cloisters houses the Metropolitan Museum's medieval art collection in a 1930s landmark, built of stones scavenged from ancient European monasteries. Inside the historic Audubon Terrace complex, the Hispanic Society of America is lined with with Goyas, El Grecos, and Spanish decorative arts. For adventure, try rock climbing with Hudson River views at Fort Tryton Park, or explore the decommissioned Little Red Lighthouse hidden under the George Washington Bridge.
Manhattan owes its iconic skyline and over-the-top style to Midtown East. Give your regards to Broadway from Herald Square, then summit neighboring Empire State Building for giddy 360-degree views. King Kong was right: this is the best vantage point in Manhattan. Farther uptown, Rockefeller Center's Top of the Rock triple-decker observation platform offers panoramas over the Empire State and Chrysler Buildings. Nobody does holidays like Midtown East, with its Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade, Christmas Spectaculars at Radio City Music Hall, and Rockefeller Center's ice rink and multi-story Christmas tree. Between holidays, Midtown East hits the books at New York Public Library and works toward world peace at the United Nations. MoMA keeps Manhattanites talking with daring performance art. Even rush-hour commuters stop and stare at Grand Central Terminal's Main Concourse Tiffany glass windows, and toast promotions with Champagne and Long Island oysters at Grand Central's vintage 1913 Oyster Bar.
Some reasons to schlep out to Park Slope and Prospect Heights are obvious: the risk-taking Brooklyn Museum, the autumn leaves and summer roses at Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and concerts from Jay-Z to Barbara Streisand at Barclay's Center. Park Slope's Blue Ribbon Brasserie earns its accolades with inventive surf-and-turf like oysters and bone marrow, and Union Hall bar aims to please everyone with leather club chairs and bookshelves, bocce ball courts and live music. The F and Q lines connect Manhattan to Prospect Heights at the Prospect Park stop, and onward to the newly renovated boardwalk and carnival rides at Coney Island. But walk past Park Slope's new shops and old brownstones where kids still play on the stoops, and you'll see what keeps New Yorkers here.
The Bronx seems gruff at first, but only tourists buy that act. This northern borough is the destination of choice for New Yorkers under 12, lured by the gorillas, polar bears, and tigers at the Bronx Zoo. Whether you're rooting for the home team or giving them the old Bronx cheer, the crowd goes wild for games at the Bronx's Yankee Stadium. For a gourmet authenticity trip, skip Little Italy and head to the Italian delis along Bronx's Arthur Avenue. To answer the obvious question: yes, scenes from The Sopranos were shot here. If Manhattan's concrete jungle leaves you claustrophobic, find breathing room among the greenery at Bronx's New York Botanical Garden. Don't miss the Botanical Garden's annual holiday train show, featuring model trains chugging past New York landmarks made entirely of plants. The Bronx hasn't been Brooklynized, and remains an economically and ethnically mixed family neighborhood. New row houses, old high-rise housing projects, and chain stores in art deco buildings are all part of the Bronx scenery.
Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass may not sound like the kind of place you'd want to spend a date night, but DUMBO will change your mind. Sunsets are sublime at Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, where you can see clear across the harbor to Manhattan. Shows at DUMBO Arts Center regularly overflow into art crawls and installations under the bridge, and theater and music acts launch Broadway-worthy productions at St. Ann's Warehouse. LEED-certified green Galapagos Art Space knows that comedy burlesque and Nerd Nights go down better with a full bar. Good thing DUMBO is within stumbling distance of the York Street subway. Downtown Brooklyn is comparatively lacking in nightlife, but shows at Brooklyn Academy of Music and Rose Cinemas in Fort Greene are worth the detour. Reserve ahead for one of 18 seats at the Michelin-starred chef's table inside Brooklyn Fare grocery store, or venture over to acclaimed Vinegar Hill House for newfangled old-fashioned feasts of cast-iron-roasted chicken and Guinness chocolate cake.
Get ready for serious fun. Opera, natural history, fashion and design may seem stuffy elsewhere, but they're a good time had by all on the Upper West Side. Peek inside the glittering jewelry-box theaters at Lincoln Center, and you'll find ballerinas, Metropolitan Opera divas, and the entire New York Philharmonic. During New York Fashion Week, supermodels lumber through Lincoln Center like giraffes on safari. Jazz at Lincoln Center is over at Columbus Circle, near the controversial new ceramic-tiled home of Museum of Arts and Design. The Upper West side is all grown up, but it's also family friendly. The American Museum of Natural History was the setting for the Night at the Museum blockbuster movies, and mummies, dinosaurs and meteorites are the breakout stars of its collection of 32 million weird and wonderful specimens. For child prodigies, The Children's Museum of Manhattan offers Grinch toy-making workshops, while Symphony Space offers readings with Lemony Snickett and other children's book authors. Kids and parents worn out by Central Park's Safari Playground can nap on Strawberry Fields afterwards.
The urge to break into song is undeniable here, even if you don't have a gig at Carnegie Hall. Marquees lining Broadway from 42nd to 54th bring show tunes to mind, and Times Square may have you humming Auld Lang Syne months before New Year's Eve. The illuminated ball drop has heralded calendar changes in Times Square since 1908, but the neighborhood has changed around it. Blinking jumbotrons and digital stock tickers line Broadway's Great White Way, and family-friendly 42nd St. attractions like Madame Tussaud's and Ripley's Believe It or Not! help draw 39 million visitors annually to the area. Times Square underwear ads and underwear-clad singing Naked Cowboy are distant echoes of Midtown West's seedy Midnight Cowboy days in the 1970s, when hustlers and porn palaces greeted new arrivals around the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Smoking is among the many vices now banned in Times Square, and city planners are rebranding neighboring Hell's Kitchen as Clinton to make it seem less intimidating to Javits Convention Center visitors. But gentlemen's-club memorabilia still surfaces at Hell's Kitchen's Flea Market, and native New Yorker Lady Gaga keeps trying to shock seen-it-all Midtowners at Madison Square Garden. Think you can do better? Koreatown karaoke bars are standing by.
Back in the 1970s, artists saw potential in the old textile warehouses in the Triangle Below Canal St ("TriBeCa")—and now it's America's most desirable patch of real estate. The neighborhood is one of the city's most historic, with cobblestone streets and stately 1804-1828 Federal townhouses along Harrison Street. Comfort food goes upscale in Tribeca eateries like TriBakery, Edward's and The Harrison, but Bubby's Pie Company remains the neighborhood's sentimental favorite for burgers and late-night breakfasts. Tribeca has a glorious back yard in Hudson River Park, with sunset views and five miles of trails. And yes, that probably was a celebrity jogging past—Tribeca lofts and the swanky Tribeca Grand Hotel are the crash pads of choice for movie stars proving themselves on Broadway. Tribeca made a creative comeback after September 11, when longtime Tribeca resident Robert De Niro co-founded the Tribeca Film Festival.
New York names can be misleading. Little Italy should be called "Tiny and Sort of Italian" while Chinatown is a city atop Vietnamese noodles. Since Nolita seceded from the neighborhood, Little Italy has precious little to call its own besides the annual Feast of San Gennaro. The Ravenite Social Club once hosted Lucky Luciano and John Gotti as Little Italy's gangster hub; today it's an upscale shoe boutique. Today only 5% of Little Italy residents are actually Italian American, but anyone can be Italian for the night at classic eateries like Torrisi Italian Specialties and cozy Focolare. Chinatown and Little Italy share a boundary and a historic designation, but their outlook is strikingly different. The September 11 attacks had a chilling effect on business in neighboring Chinatown, with a sharp decline in tourism and the local garment trade. But the neighborhood rallied, and today Chinatown has around 90,000 residents, many of Chinese and Vietnamese descent. Though many residents arrived after 1965, this is one of the largest and oldest Chinatowns in the West. The Museum of Chinese in America traces the story of Chinese New Yorkers from 1858 to the present, and offers walking tours covering historic Chinese restaurants, cinemas, stores and landmarks.
The melting pot gets its flavor from the Lower East Side, where Kosher-salted delis meet spicy Puerto Rican bodegas on Delancey Street. Eldridge Street echoes with klezmer and Chinese opera at the annual Egg Cream & Egg Roll Festival each June. Over on Bowery St, the New Museum of Contemporary Museum of Art induces double takes and the Bowery Ballroom will keep you up late. For New Yorkers who wax nostalgic about Manhattan before gentrification of the Bowery, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum is an important reality check. Once you've seen the cramped living conditions that greeted arrivals fresh off the proverbial boat from Ellis Island, condos don't seem like such a bad alternative. Boutique hotels along Rivington and a high density of restaurants make the East Village a far more attractive landing spot for visitors today.
Shop in Nolita until you drop at one of SoHo's sleek boutique hotels. The rebel child of Little Italy and SoHo, North of Little Italy ("NoLIta") packs indie fashion boutiques and date-worthy bistros into 16 blocks. SoHo is older and grander, with narrow streets lined with wrought iron and glass lofts dating back to the Industrial Revolution. Rising rents mean galleries have been replaced by chain stores in SoHo, but it's still a fabulous place to stay. But if you want to score a table in SoHo, call ahead. SoHo has Manhattan's most notorious waiting lists, especially at Balthazar. Cosmopolitan date nights call for foreign cinema at SoHo's Film Forum and Italian-accented fare at Nolita bistros like Peasant or Balaboosta. Nolita is home to the 1809 Old St. Patrick Cathedral, but we won't blame you if you skip mass Sunday mornings.
Right above the Upper West Side is Morningside Heights, a classic overachiever with Manhattan's highest concentration of colleges and seminaries. The Hungarian Pastry Shop and Oren's Daily Roast provide fuel for recitals at Manhattan School of Music, protests at Columbia University's Low Library, and browsing at Barnard College's collection of 'zines by women. For contemplative moments away from the roar of downtown, roam the grounds at Grant's Tomb and check out an organ concert at the unfinished Cathedral of St. John the Divine. North of 125th St., Washington Heights revives the senses with Dominican diners and unexpected artistic masterpieces. The Cloisters houses the Metropolitan Museum's medieval art collection in a 1930s landmark, built of stones scavenged from ancient European monasteries. Inside the historic Audubon Terrace complex, the Hispanic Society of America is lined with with Goyas, El Grecos, and Spanish decorative arts. For adventure, try rock climbing with Hudson River views at Fort Tryton Park, or explore the decommissioned Little Red Lighthouse hidden under the George Washington Bridge.
Shop in Nolita until you drop at one of SoHo's sleek boutique hotels. The rebel child of Little Italy and SoHo, North of Little Italy ("NoLIta") packs indie fashion boutiques and date-worthy bistros into 16 blocks. SoHo is older and grander, with narrow streets lined with wrought iron and glass lofts dating back to the Industrial Revolution. Rising rents mean galleries have been replaced by chain stores in SoHo, but it's still a fabulous place to stay. But if you want to score a table in SoHo, call ahead. SoHo has Manhattan's most notorious waiting lists, especially at Balthazar. Cosmopolitan date nights call for foreign cinema at SoHo's Film Forum and Italian-accented fare at Nolita bistros like Peasant or Balaboosta. Nolita is home to the 1809 Old St Patrick Cathedral, but won't blame you if you skip mass Sunday mornings.
Namedropping comes with the territory in Greenwich Village. Manhattan museums would be half-empty without the Village, home to painters from Winslow Homer to Jackson Pollock. Jazz greats John Coltrane, Billie Holiday and Miles Davis played the Village Vanguard and America's first integrated clubs around Sheridan Square. In between sets at Bleecker Street dives like the Bitter End, folk legends like Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Simon & Garfunkel mingled with perpetual protestors in Washington Square Park. Musicals are so uptown; the Village prefers off-off-Broadway drama and underground comedy by Jerry Seinfeld and Louis CK at the Comedy Cellar and Village Lantern. Writer's block dissolves in Village coffeehouses and bookstores, regular haunts for writers from Mark Twain to Maya Angelou. But the Village isn't all talk. NBA players are elbowed aside by street ballers at the nation's toughest pick-up game, held on the West 4th court known as The Cage. Gay bar patrons made history when they defied a police raid in 1969 at Stonewall Inn; today it's a National Historic Landmark. Christopher Street remains out and proud, though the trendy GLBT bar scene has drifted north to the Meatpacking District.
New York names can be misleading. Little Italy should be called "Tiny and Sort of Italian" while Chinatown is a city atop Vietnamese noodles. Since Nolita seceded from the neighborhood, Little Italy has precious little to call its own besides the annual Feast of San Gennaro. The Ravenite Social Club once hosted Lucky Luciano and John Gotti as Little Italy's gangster hub; today it's an upscale shoe boutique. Today only 5 percent of Little Italy residents are actually Italian American, but anyone can be Italian for the night at classic eateries like Torrisi Italian Specialties and cozy Focolare. Chinatown and Little Italy share a boundary and a historic designation, but their outlook is strikingly different. The September 11 attacks had a chilling effect on business in neighboring Chinatown, with a sharp decline in tourism and the local garment trade. But the neighborhood rallied, and today Chinatown has around 90,000 residents, many of Chinese and Vietnamese descent. Though many residents arrived after 1965, this is one of the largest and oldest Chinatowns in the West. The Museum of Chinese in America traces the story of Chinese New Yorkers from 1858 to the present, and offers walking tours covering historic Chinese restaurants, cinemas, stores, and landmarks.
When you ask a punk to pass the salt, you've officially arrived in the East Village. This eastern addendum to Greenwich Village earned its legendary street rep from graffiti artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring and the late, great punk club CBGB. The East Village scene lives on at late-night Polish delis around Tompkins Square Park, poetry slams at Nuyorican Poets Café, and neck-tattooed spa-goers at the Russian & Turkish Baths. By day the East Village straightens up and makes nice, with skateboarders and Starbuckers sharing sidewalks around Astor Place. Chefs keep it real in the East Village, dishing award-winning eats at reasonable prices at Momofuku Noodle Bar, Milk Bar, and Terroir Wine Bar. But real estate developers with no such scruples have carved off a hunk of East Village north of Houston, forming the upscale NoHo district. Where East Village walk-ups and basement vintage stores end, NoHo lofts and curated storefronts begin.
Williamsburg and Greenpoint can get a tad smug, but there's no denying their historic charms. City Reliquary collects quality Statue of Liberty kitsch and only-in-New-York stories, like the one about the guy who tried every pizza slice in the city. Williamsburg enjoys the simple pleasures in life: German Chocolate cake in the back yard at Bakeri, spelling bees for free hooch at Pete's Candy Store, 1980s video games and craft beer at Barcade. Reinvented American classics like chicken cooked under a brick are served with a knowing wink and sides of oysters at Williamsburg's Marlow & Sons. For simple, honest meat and drink, try Peter Luger, a 100-year-old German steakhouse, or head to Fette Sau for barbecue and bourbon in a converted auto body shop. Williamsburg hotels have more space and none of the traffic hassles of Manhattan, plus it's that much closer to La Guardia and JFK airports.
When you ask a punk to pass the salt, you've officially arrived in the East Village. This eastern addendum to Greenwich Village earned its legendary street rep from graffiti artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring and the late, great punk club CBGB. The East Village scene lives on at late-night Polish delis around Tompkins Square Park, poetry slams at Nuyorican Poets Café, and neck-tattooed spa-goers at the Russian & Turkish Baths. By day the East Village straightens up and makes nice, with skateboarders and Starbuckers sharing sidewalks around Astor Place. Chefs keep it real in the East Village, dishing award-winning eats at reasonable prices at Momofuku Noodle Bar, Milk Bar and Terroir Wine Bar. But real estate developers with no such scruples have carved off a hunk of East Village north of Houston, forming the upscale NoHo district. Where East Village walk-ups and basement vintage stores end, NoHo lofts and curated storefronts begin.
Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass may not sound like the kind of place you'd want to spend a date night, but DUMBO will change your mind. Sunsets are sublime at Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park, where you can see clear across the harbor to Manhattan. Shows at DUMBO Arts Center regularly overflow into art crawls and installations under the bridge, and theater and music acts launch Broadway-worthy productions at St. Ann's Warehouse. LEED-certified green Galapagos Art Space knows that comedy burlesque and Nerd Nights go down better with a full bar. Good thing DUMBO is within stumbling distance of the York Street subway. Downtown Brooklyn is comparatively lacking in nightlife, but shows at Brooklyn Academy of Music and Rose Cinemas in Fort Greene are worth the detour. Reserve ahead for one of 18 seats at the Michelin-starred chef's table inside Brooklyn Fare Grocery Store, or venture over to acclaimed Vinegar Hill House for newfangled old-fashioned feasts of cast-iron-roasted chicken and Guinness chocolate cake.
Diehard Manhattanites who kvetch about crossing a bridge learn the error of their ways in Brooklyn Heights. These tree-lined streets are a study in 19th century New York architectural flair, including the 1880 Queen Anne that now houses the Brooklyn Historical Society. Nothing takes the edge off a New York summer like Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory's chocolate chunk with caramel sauce, enjoyed in the shade of the Brooklyn Bridge. The best sunset views of Manhattan are along Brooklyn Heights Promenade, but there's plenty of native Brooklyn quirk here too. When you need a beard trim and Yemeni lamb, look no further than the Brooklyn Heights brownstone housing Atlantic Barber/Yemeni CafŽ. Montague Street fashion boutiques deliver looks that travel easily uptown, downtown and upstate. Stop by New York Transit Museum to pose in vintage subway cars and hear hair-raising stories of building subway tunnels under the East River—though you may want to forget that on your subway ride back to Manhattan.
Name an American cultural breakthrough and chances are good it happened in Harlem. This neighborhood survived flappers and gangsters in the 1920s, booed almost everyone offstage at the Apollo except Ella Fitzgerald, Jimi Hendrix and Michael Jackson, and revolutionized America from Marcus Garvey to Malcom X. See the writing on the wall at the Graffiti Wall of Fame at 106th and Park, then head over to the Studio Museum to watch African American artists change art history. Harlem launched jazz and hip hop and taught Madonna how to vogue, so expect big nights out. Get schooled at the Jazz Museum in Harlem before jazz sets at historic art deco Lenox Lounge. Hit Shrine for slick beats and reggae, and end up at Ginny's Supper Club for soul food with a side of blues. For the morning after, Amy Ruth's serves the Reverend Al Sharpton special: chicken and waffles, gravy optional. East Harlem is largely Latino, and known as El Barrio. The pride of the neighborhood is El Museo del Barrio, a small space packed with contemporary Caribbean and Latin art and encounters with such notables as Nobel Prize winning poet Derek Walcott.
Our friends at Eater.com pick the city's best restaurants each quarter, and we trust their opinion. See full list »
Locanda Verde
Though owners include one Robert DeNiro, chef Andrew Carmellini is the real star here. After almost three years, this rustic neighborhood Italian restaurant is still one of the hottest tickets in town. [Krieger]
Barbarini Alimentari
Part restaurant, part Italian grocery, Barbarini serves solid Italian sandwiches and simply prepared pastas, salads, and fish dishes. When the weather's nice, their sidewalk cafe space is a great place to sit and snack on cheese and salumi while gazing out at cobblestone-lined streets of the Seaport.
[Photo: Barbarini]
Balthazar Restaurant
Restaurateur Keith McNally's enduring Soho brasserie is the best every day restaurant in New York City. Period. [Krieger]
Rubirosa
This stylish Little Italy restaurant serves stellar thin crust pizzas, plus a number of classic Italian dishes from Olana-vet Al DiMeglio. The pies are made from a family recipes developed at Joe & Pat's on Staten Island, and they're well worth the trip alone, but don't overlook the pastas — they're phenomenal. [Photo]
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