Quebec, QC Hotels
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“For a budget-friendly trip visit Quebec during one of its two shoulder seasons.”
The capital city of Canada’s belle province is full of firsts, oldests, and bests: It’s the only fortified city north of Mexico, a UNESCO Heritage Site, and it’s the home of North America’s oldest pilgrimage site, Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré Shrine. The city might be an ocean away from its francophone counterpart in Europe but it still has that je ne sais quoi you thought was only in the old country.

Hipmunk's Best Hotels in Quebec, QC

Hôtel Le Concorde Québec
Hôtel Le Concorde Québec
|
3.9
1225 Cours du General de Montcalm, Quebec
from $61
Hotel Port Royal
Hotel Port Royal
|
4.3
144, rue Saint-Pierre, Quebec
from $126
Auberge Maison Roy
Auberge Maison Roy
|
3.9
1365 Boul Rene-levesque Ouest, Quebec
from $69
Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac
Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac
|
4.5
1 rue des Carrieres, Quebec
from $264
Hotel Clarendon
Hotel Clarendon
|
4.3
57 rue Sainte-Anne, Quebec
from $112
Hilton Quebec
Hilton Quebec
|
4.1
1100 Rene Levesque East, Quebec
from $118
Hôtel de Glace
Hôtel de Glace
|
4.3
1860, boulevard Valcartier, Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier
from $251
Hotel Manoir Victoria
Hotel Manoir Victoria
|
4.5
44, Cote du Palais, Quebec
from $92
Best Western Plus City Centre/Centre-Ville
Best Western Plus City Centre/Centre-Ville
|
4.1
330, de la Couronne street, Quebec
from $90
Ambassadeur Hotel
Ambassadeur Hotel
|
3.5
3401, boul. Saint-Anne, Quebec
from $60
More About Quebec, QC Hotels...

In a city as sophisticated as Quebec, you might think finding affordable accommodation is a daunting task. However, with inexpensive bed and breakfasts like Auberge Maison Roy, Airbnb options, and cheap hostels in town, we’ve found an option for every budget.

A Tale of Two Cities

Quebec City is divided into Haute-Ville (Upper Town) and Basse-Ville (Lower Town) and connected by a steep set of stairs affectionately called escaliers casse-cou, or the breakneck stairs. To travel between the two towns you can either get your exercise climbing the steps or ride the Old Quebec Funicular for $2.

Each town is home to diverse neighborhoods with their own unique attractions. In Upper Town you can see the famous Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, Quebec City’s equivalent of the Eiffel Tower. It’s the city's most popular attraction and claims to be North America's most photographed hotel. The chic hotel was once the home of the Governor-General, Her Majesty the Queen’s representative in Canada. Rooms regularly go for more than $170 a night.

For something a little more low-key, check out Terrasse Dufferin and take in the view over Lower Town and the St. Lawrence River. Stroll around Saint-Roch, an up-and-coming neighborhood with quirky cafés, gastropubs, and food tours led by the city tourism agency. This part of Old Quebec is as hip and modern as it gets!

Lower Town is a quintessentially Québécois area with cobblestone streets more than 400 years old and all the old world charm you can imagine. Travelers will find plenty of food options but watch your budget: Lower Town is known to be more expensive than Upper Town. To step back in time head to Place Royale, where Samuel de Champlain founded the first French settlement in 1608.

Stay Somewhere BCBG

BCBG stands for bon chic bon genre, or ‘good style, good sort,’ and Quebec is filled to the brim with it. The city's lodgings tend toward boutique hotels in historic buildings, quaint bed and breakfasts, and upscale hostels. In downtown Quebec visitors will find more modern accommodations and recognizable hotel brands such as the Hilton and the Delta.

Visitors can choose hotels like the ultramodern, eco-friendly TRYP by Wyndham Quebec Pur Hotel in St. Roch, where a room costs $85 per night. Those with a slightly bigger budget might consider the Hotel Le Germain-Dominion in the Old Port neighborhood, near Rue Saint-Paul, art galleries, antique stores, and the old stock exchange.

For something homier, check out Bed & Breakfast L’Heure Douce. This restored bed and breakfast in Vieux-Quebec is just a short walk away from Château Frontenac and the Capitol. The B&B is perfectly located for admiring views of the old city and the Laurentian Mountains.

For the best value for your money, stay at HI Quebec, Auberge Internationale de Quebec. This hostel is part of the Hostelling International network and provides modern and comfortable dorms for just $28 per night.

Quebec Comes Alive in the Winter

Whereas most cities all but shut down in the winter, Quebec City becomes a wonderland. It’s no secret that Quebec gets some stunningly cold winters, but bundling up in a parka with a cup of Tim Hortons coffee is part of its charm.

The Winter Carnival draws thousands of revelers every year for ice skating, hot chocolate, and bonhomme carnaval, the festival’s winter snowman mascot. It’s the perfect time for snow sports like cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, but because of the event's popularity, hotels book quickly.

Montmorency Falls Park is best enjoyed in the summer, but the cold winters bring a unique view to this 83-meter (272 feet) tall waterfall (almost 100 feet higher than Niagara Falls!). In below-zero weather the falls’ spray freezes and forms an intriguing ‘sugar loaf’ pattern that shouldn’t be missed.

Winter also happens to be the only time visitors can stay in North America’s only Ice Hotel! Rooms go for almost $300 a night, but visitors can take a tour for just $17.50.

Live Like a Local With Airbnb

Quebec City has more than 100 Airbnb rentals available right in the heart of the city. Room prices are a bit higher than a hostel's, but in exchange you get a private room instead of a dorm bed. Visitors staying near the Old Port can head to the farmer’s market to buy cheap and tasty produce to save on eating out.

There’s More to Québécois Cuisine Than Poutine

In Quebec you’ll find the French appreciation for wine but the British penchant for hearty comfort food. The city's culinary scene is young and fiercely dedicated to using made-in-Quebec ingredients. Leading the way is Le Clocher Penché, a restaurant in Saint-Roch perfect for any committed locavore. The menu lists the local artisans and farmers who helped bring the food to your plate, the food is organic and delicious, and the decor is creative yet elegant.

Maple syrup is one of Quebec’s most prized products and every March cabanes à sucres, or sugar shacks, pour the saccharine treat over snow or the Québécois version of a Full English breakfast: pancakes, beans, Canadian bacon, and more.

Spring and Fall are Best for Budgets

For a budget-friendly trip, visit Quebec during one of its two shoulder seasons. Between March and May temperatures start to climb and snow melts, meaning winter sports are coming to a halt. This is the perfect time for maple syrup lovers to learn more about the delicacy during its peak production. In March visitors can take part in the Red Bull Crashed Ice event or the St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

October and November are also slow months. The summer festivals have died down but the winter weather hasn’t started yet. Hotels slash their room rates but it’s still prime sightseeing weather. It’s also the most colorful time of the year, as maple leaves have changed to their red and orange colors.

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