Saint Petersburg Hotels
“If you’re traveling on a budget, dorm beds are by far your cheapest option in St. Petersburg.”
St. Petersburg may no longer be the political capital of Russia, but it is undeniably its art and culture capital. Fantastic art collections, historic palaces and summer festivals draw visitors from all over the world, and its many intertwining canals and location on the Gulf of Finland earn it the nickname “Venice of the North.” While St. Petersburg may still be a costly city, it’s far more affordable to stay there than in its big sister Moscow. Cheap mini-hotels such as Adagio na Fontanke, and dorm beds like those in the Baby Lemonade Hostel, are increasingly easier to come by.

Hipmunk's Best Hotels in Saint Petersburg

Hotel Saint Petersburg
Hotel Saint Petersburg
|
2.5
1104 reviews
Pirogovskaya Embankment 5/2, St Petersburg
from $50
Nevsky Hotel Grand
Nevsky Hotel Grand
|
3.4
1672 reviews
10 Bolshaya Konyushennaya, St Petersburg
from $47
AZIMUT Hotel St. Petersburg
AZIMUT Hotel St. Petersburg
|
3.2
1504 reviews
43-1 Lermontovsky Prospect, St Petersburg
from $54
Aston Hotel
Aston Hotel
|
3.7
1254 reviews
5 Vladimirskiy prospect, St Petersburg
from $50
Hotel Oktiabrskaya, Ligovsky branch
Hotel Oktiabrskaya, Ligovsky branch
41/83, Ligovsky prosp., St Petersburg
from $132
Top Ambassador
Top Ambassador
|
3.8
1092 reviews
5-7 Rimsky-Korsakov Avenue, St Petersburg
from $79
Belmond Grand Hotel Europe
Belmond Grand Hotel Europe
1/7 Mikhailovskaya street Nevsky Prospekt, St Petersburg
from $270
The Taleon Imperial Hotel
The Taleon Imperial Hotel
|
3.8
649 reviews
59 Moika Emb, St Petersburg
from $236
Park Inn by Radisson Nevsky
Park Inn by Radisson Nevsky
|
3.4
1700 reviews
4A Goncharnaya str. / 89 Nevsky pr., St Petersburg
from $107
Hotel Dostoevsky
Hotel Dostoevsky
|
3.2
573 reviews
19 Vladimirsky Prospect, St Petersburg
from $49
More About Saint Petersburg Hotels...

Summertime Is Best -- And Most Expensive

St. Petersburg may have a slightly milder climate than Moscow, thanks to its location on the water, but “mild” is a relative term here. Russian winters aren’t for the faint of heart. Most tourists don’t dare to brave the cold and darkness, so summer in St. Petersburg is peak season, and the time of year when accommodation prices are at their highest. Arriving in St. Petersburg in May or September may help you avoid some of the larger crowds and higher prices, while still affording you ample sunlight and a frostbite-free vacation. 

The White Nights festival, from mid-June to early July, celebrates nearly 23 hours of daily sunlight, and Russians flood the streets to soak up as much Vitamin D as they can in the short summer window. At night, locals and tourists alike can take advantage of the many shows, concerts, and parties around the city. Hotel prices also spike during the White Nights.

Cheaper Sights in a Costly City

St. Petersburg’s most visited sights are spaced pretty closely together in the main city center, making it easy to catch all of them in one trip. If you’re traveling on a budget, consider checking out some free attractions.

Dvortsovaya Ploschad (Palace Square) is the central plaza in St. Petersburg, and it’s of course free to walk around and soak up the architecture and feel of the place. Keep in mind that hotel prices will be the highest around this plaza. Other free attractions include the statue of The Bronze Horseman, a figure of Peter the Great, a stroll around the royal gardens of the palace of Peterhof, or a free guided walking tour of the city. 

Hostels and Mini-Hotels have the best deals

Hostels are a bit slower to catch on in Russia than the rest of Europe, so St. Petersburg is not saturated with hostel options. That said, the ones it does have are incredibly affordable and even rather central. If you’re traveling on a budget, dorm beds are by far your cheapest option in St. Petersburg.

Look into the Party Train hostel, which starts at $9 a night in the off-season. (The name alone promises a good time.) Also check out the Old Flat Hostel on Nekrasova, which receives good reviews, is central, and can cost as low as a mere $3 a night for a dorm bed. In as expensive a city as St. Petersburg, that’s like finding a needle in a haystack.

The Baby Lemonade Hostel is another steal, and it’s hard to beat its location, situated right off St. Petersburg’s main drag.

Consider Up-and-Coming Neighborhoods in the Outskirts

The main historical center of St. Petersburg lies between the Neva and the Fontanka River. Naturally, the city center will be the most expensive place to stay, and cheap deals on hotels or pensions may be impossible to come by, especially in summer. If you are able to find a cheap hotel in the center, it’s very likely that you’ll sacrifice comfort for price. Some options, like the Capital Hotel, may be a close walk to the main attractions, but the reviews are less than stellar.

Consider staying farther out and arriving to the main sites by public transportation to save money. Look into staying in some of the up-and-coming neighborhoods that aren’t quite as well-known as the historic center. Most places in the outskirts are easily accessible by St. Petersburg’s cheap and efficient Metro. Areas like South of Nevsky, Petrograd Side, and Vasilevsky Island have growing bar and restaurant scenes, as well as a hospitality industry that has embraced lower prices. There, you may be able to score some better hotel deals.

Mini-Hotels Are an Economic Alternative

Another option to cut accommodation costs is to consider staying in mini-hotels like Adagio na Fontanke. Mini-hotels are becoming popular in some of these areas just outside the city center. Mini-hotels are, as the name implies, much smaller complexes of as few as 10 or 12 rooms, usually in one or two stories of a converted apartment building. Rates can be much lower in mini-hotels than in their typical hotel counterparts, and you can sometimes even find relatively cheap ones right in the city center.

Turn to Airbnb for Dramatic Savings

As more and more Russians catch on to the lucrative prospects of renting out their own rooms and flats, Airbnb options have never been better in St. Petersburg. There are well over a thousand listings in the city, with options for every taste and budget.

Private rooms in the city center go for as low as $20, which is a steal considering the similar cost of a dorm bed in a hostel. Realistically, though, in the center you should expect to pay between $35 and $50. Entire studio rentals go for about the same, increasing proportionally in price the more guests the place can accommodate. 

Just as with hotels, the average price of Airbnb private rooms and entire rentals drops as you head away from the heart of the historic district, or the waterfronts.

St. Petersburg is a beloved city of Russia, and luckily, with an uprising of mini-hotels and more hostels, it’s becoming more accessible to the budget traveler. Visitors fall in love with St. Petersburg’s art, history and architecture. Catch it in the summertime and you may never want to leave. 

 

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